Welcome to the Harvard Department of Linguistics

The Department of Linguistics is home to one of the oldest and most distinguished linguistics programs in the United States. The Department emphasizes the inseparability of theoretical and empirical work, and the interrelatedness of diachronic and synchronic approaches to the study of language. Much of the strength of Linguistics at Harvard derives from the unique range and depth of the University's offerings in related disciplines, especially ancient and modern languages, and the growing Mind/Brain/Behavior Initiative.

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Job Opportunities

Assistant Professor of Linguistics 

https://academicpositions.harvard.edu/postings/5735

Spell-Out Blog

Week of November 24, 2014

Language Universals Workshop 

Andrew Nevins (University College London)
The Rise and Fall of the L-Shaped Morphome: Diachronic and Experimental Studies
Monday, November 24 | 5:30pm | Boylston 303

Huang Receives Lifetime Achievement Award

The Department is excited to share the news that Professor  C.-T. James Huang has received the 2014 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Linguistic Society of Taiwan "in recognition of [his] distinguished contribution in linguistic research and in sowing seeds of linguistics, inspiring young minds and mentoring promising scholars in Taiwan and elsewhere in the world". He was unable to attend the ceremony, but made a face-time appearance to deliver his speech. Congratulations, Jim!

Graduate Student Workshop 2014

The 4th Annual Harvard Graduate Student Workshop in Linguistics, co-sponsored by the Department of Linguistics and the Harvard Graduate Student Council, took place on Saturday, November 22. Thanks to the hard work of the HGSL committee, the event was a great success with seven presentations and more than 25 students, visitors, and faculty attending.

  • Lena Borise: Dissecting stress: peculiar developments in a Belarusian dialect
  • Zuzanna Fuchs: When and where can we use coordinated WH questions?
  • Yuyin He: Focus and the idiosyncratic copular sentence in Mandarin
  • Peter Schuelke: Case marking and word order in Roviana
  • Laine Stranahan & Yujing Huang: Testing the Unaccusative hypothesis: an eye-tracking study
  • Julia Sturm: The nota accusativi in Classical Armenian
  • Yimei Xiang: Mention-some and mention-all readings of modalized questions


Photos by Edwin Tsai

Assistant Professor Position Announcement

For more information, please visit the academic positions website.

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